How Cialis Works

Cialis is the product of a collaboration between the pharmaceutical corporation Eli Lilly and ICOS, a biotechnology company. It is part of a new generation of erectile dysfunction medications that can be taken orally for the condition. Erectile dysfunction is thought to affect millions of men.

The Drug Cialis is one in a class of medications called selective phosphodiesterase Type 5 inhibitors, or PDE5, that treat the most basic cause of erectile dysfunction—blood flow. Other popular medications in this category include Viagra and Levitra. Erectile dysfunction occurs when blood flow is obstructed to the penis for a variety of reasons. A normal penile erection is based on a series of mental and physical functions all happening in tandem. Some of these basic functions are nerve impulses, arterial blood flow, and the ability of muscle tissue to relax. When one or more of these is impaired or damaged, erectile dysfunction can become a problem. A problem develops when there is a regular inability to either get or keep an erection necessary for sexual activity.

Phosphodiesterase Type 5 is an enzyme that breaks down cyclic guanosine monophosphate, or cGMP. cGMP are the chemicals that promote proper production of nitric oxide, a neurotransmitter in the brain that basically communicates with the muscle tissues in the penis, telling them to relax. When these tissues become relaxed, blood flow into the arteries of the penis is increased, leading to an erection.

The success of Cialis is based on its main ingredient known as tadalafil. Tadalafil is beneficial in the treatment of ED because it delivers a long-lasting window of action. In fact, Cialis is good for up to 36 hours once it is taken, allowing a man and his partner to take their time in taking advantage of the drug’s effects.


Before taking any medication promising to relieve erectile dysfunction, a man should first contact his doctor. A full medical history and exam will be conducted. Erectile dysfunction can be caused by many different factors and medical conditions, such as diabetes, drug and alcohol abuse, smoking, nervous system disorders, depression, or hormone imbalances.